BPDA Board approves over 280 residential units at September Meeting

0
378

BOSTON–The Boston Planning & Development Agency (BPDA) Board of Directors last night approved development projects in neighborhoods across the City of Boston, which will result in new market-rate and income-restricted residential units, economic development, and jobs.

Overall, the development projects approved this month will create an additional 286 residential units, including 49 income-restricted units, and 307 trade jobs, 31 direct jobs and 164 indirect and induced jobs.

The residential projects moving forward make progress towards Mayor Martin J. Walsh’s goal of increasing affordable housing to support a strong middle-class. On Thursday, Mayor Walsh signed a Home Rule Petition that would codify the Inclusionary Development Policy (IDP) into Boston’s Zoning Code to protect the City’s ability to create and fund income-restricted housing, and enable Boston to have more flexibility to fund affordable housing and workforce training through Boston’s Linkage program. The proposal now moves to the Massachusetts Legislature for approval.

In addition to development projects, the BPDA Board voted to adopt the Coastal Flood Resilience Design Guidelines. The Guidelines build on Mayor Walsh’s Climate Ready Boston and will serve as a resource to translate flood resiliency strategies into best practices.

The BPDA Board also approved next steps for PLAN: South Boston Dorchester Avenue. Nelson/Nygaard Consulting Associates, Inc. was authorized as the transportation consultant for the PLAN: South Boston Dorchester Avenue Transportation Plan after an open and competitive Request for Proposal (RFP) process. The Transportation Plan will advance and refine the transit recommendations within the ongoing planning initiative for the neighborhood.

The BPDA Board voted to adopt a South Boston Neighborhood District Text Amendment. This amendment is the result of extensive analysis and discussions with the South Boston community regarding the neighborhood’s zoning-related concerns, which include vertical extensions that are out of character with the existing neighborhood context, the demolition of smaller buildings to erect larger, denser structures with an increased number of dwelling units, and the rear yard fill-ins in which open space is eliminated by rear additions that block light and air from abutting properties. The resulting Amendment will update the Boston Zoning Code to protect the existing fabric of neighborhood structures and low-density housing stock. The Amendment will now go to the Boston Zoning Commission for approval.

Development Projects

Located in Hyde Park’s Readville, 36-40 Sprague Street will bring 247 new, residential units, including 32 income-restricted, to the neighborhood 
Live: 247 new residential rental units, including 32 income-restricted
Work: 14,000 square feet of new, local retail
Connect: 3,000 square feet of new community work space

36-40 Sprague Street will house 247 rental units, 32 of which are income-restricted, across two, five-story structures in Hyde Park: the Sprague Building and the Courtyard Buildings. The Sprague Building, located along Sprague Street, contains 100 rental units and the Courtyard Buildings located to the east of the site contain 147 rental units. The once independent Courtyard Buildings are now linked into a single structure by a “connecter” allowing for the sharing of services and amenities. In total, the unit mix consists of approximately 44 studios and urban flats, 107 one-bedrooms, 88 two-bedroom and 8 three-bedroom.

Surrounding the buildings is a courtyard featuring outdoor recreation and gathering spaces. Amenities for the building include fitness facilities, a coffee shop and restaurant, and a daycare. There is also parking for approximately 251 vehicles.

The project will result in a $10,000 contribution for the programming and maintenance of Iacono Playground. Additionally, the proponent will provide transportation mitigation to the surrounding area, including new traffic signals, associated pedestrian and accessibility improvements and a Transit Incentive Subsidy Program.

The project is located in the Readville area of Hyde Park. Readville was identified as an expanded neighborhood in Imagine Boston 2030.

273 Highland Street, located in Roxbury, will be the largest E+, carbon neutral residential building in Boston
Live: 23 rental residential units, 15 of which will be income-restricted
Work: 30 construction jobs
Connect: Aligns with City of Boston’s energy positive (E+) Green Building Program

Located in Roxbury, 273 Highland Street will build a four-story building on a currently vacant lot. The building will contain 23 rental units, 15 of which will be income-restricted. There will be a mix of four one-bedroom units, 15 two-bedroom units and four three-bedroom units.

Guided by the City of Boston’s E+ Green Building Program, the project will be a high-performance, energy positive (E+) building, with the goal of producing more energy than it consumes.

11 Taft Hill Terrace moves forward with 16 home-ownership units in Roslindale
Live:
16 home-ownership units, including 2 income-restricted units and and a single, one-bedroom ADA unit
Work: 60 construction jobs
Connect: 16 bike storage racks, 14 covered parking spaces

The newly-approved 11 Taft Hill Terrace will construct a four-story building in Roslindale. The first level consists of a single one-bedroom ADA unit, a lobby and 14 parking spaces. The second, third and fourth levels consist of 15 home-ownership units, including two income-restricted units. These units will be a mix of one-bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bedroom units.

The project will bring several public benefits to the community, including funding to improve access around Adams Park in Roslindale and a contribution to the Gateway Path Project in the Roslindale neighborhood.